GET A CALL BACK

DRS tel mobile top 304

Search Drug & Alcohol Detox Centers Using Buprenorphine

Treatment Centers Using Buprenorphine In the United States

Opiate addiction can be treated in many different ways, which include drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs using residential or outpatient treatment, detox and medical detox programs, or even rapid detox. Many opioid users today are turning to treatment such as Buprenorphine that is used to help treat opiate addiction, especially those users who are on large amounts and have been using for quite some time. Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid, and is primarily used to treat people addicted to such drugs as heroin, oxycodone, oxycontin, and other prescribed pain medications. This particular drug is effective during detoxification, and is used for short-term and long term opioid replacement therapy. Buprenorphine is very similar to methadone, and can cause some adverse side effects if not taken properly. A user can also become physically dependent on the drug, and if stopped abruptly, the drug can cause withdrawal symptoms. Drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs and detox programs use this drug as part of a treatment regiment. Detox or medical detox is a part of treatment that allows a patient to safely withdrawal under medical supervision, and this is vitally important for opiate users.

Once a person has completed a detox program they can now enter a drug and alcohol treatment facility, and the Buprenorphine treatment can be continued throughout their rehabilitation process. In early 2000, this drug was approved by the FDA for the treatment of opiate addiction. When a user first starts out taking this drug, it must be approved and prescribed by a doctor licensed to administer this medication. In the induction phase of this treatment, a user must have had not used any opiates for a minimum of twelve hours, and is just beginning their withdrawals from the opiates they were taking. This phase is closely monitored by a doctor to ensure the dosage is working, and the patient is responding well to the treatment. During the stabilization phase of treatment, the patient has typically stopped abusing drugs, or reduced it greatly. They will have also had fewer cravings, and will be experiencing little to no side effects, and during this time the amount will be adjusted by the prescribing doctor. All of this can of course happen inside of a drug and alcohol treatment program, or when an addict is not attending drug treatment.

 

Did you know this about Buprenorphine Detox?

Buprenorphine is a partial μ-opioid agonist and κ-opioid antagonist with a long half-life and less abuse potential than methadone. For detoxification, buprenorphine is at least equivalent to methadone and is superior to clonidine.

 

During the maintenance phase of this process, the individual is on a regular dose of Buprenorphine, and is put on a short-term or long term schedule for the drug, and at the end of this treatment they will be put on a controlled withdrawal off of the drug, as it does cause a physical dependency. These particular treatments have been quite helpful for former addicts, and many past addicts have gained lifelong sobriety because of one of these maintenance programs with this drug. It is strongly recommended that a patient seeks out drug and alcohol treatment as a priority, but there are many drug rehab facilities throughout the United States that administer Buprenorphine as part of the treatment and detox programs.

What is Buprenorphine and why is it prescribed?

Buprenorphine is a semi synthetic opioid, which is used to treat opiate addiction, control severe or moderate pain, and assist in controlling chronic pain. The drug is commonly used during the detoxification process, and for short-term and long-term opiate replacement therapy. For example, a heroin addict can take this particular drug after they have gone through a heroin detox, as it will help alleviate withdrawal symptoms and prevent cravings for heroin. The unfortunate part about Buprenorphine is it can become habit forming, and as with methadone the body will develop a physical dependency to it. This simply means that when a person using this drug wants to stop taking the drug; they will have to go through a Buprenorphine detox process to taper off the medication.

Is it necessary to do a detox before treatment?

If a heroin addict is going into a drug rehab center who uses Buprenorphine as part of the rehabilitation process, they will still have to detox off the heroin, but they will gradually be put onto the Buprenorphine. When an addict is wanting to stop taking Buprenorphine, they will most definitely have to detox before they can transition into a drug rehabilitation program. Either way, the detox process is a required and important step within the rehabilitation process. The purpose of a Buprenorphine detox is to help stabilize a patient so as they are physically healthy enough to go through a treatment program.

How does a Buprenorphine detox work?

Buprenorphine detox is a process where a person will be medically withdrawn from the drug. This is usually done by gradually decreasing the dosage the person is taking and off-setting the withdrawal symptoms with another drug, such as anti-anxiety medication. Most detox programs, which provide this service will incorporate natural remedies into their treatment process. This will include large amounts of vitamin and mineral supplementation, and some type of health regiment; all in an effort to rehabilitate the person physically. The detox process can sometimes be a long and arduous process for the patient, but it is necessary. A person taking Buprenorphine cannot stop using this drug abruptly, as it can pose a serious risk to their health.

Buprenorphine Detox Programs in the United States

Buprenorphine Detox is very similar to a medical detox, but this process is specialized to help Buprenorphine users taper off the drug completely. Throughout the United States are hundreds of various detox centers, which do provide these types of services for people both addicted to Buprenorphine or dependent on it, and whom want to withdrawal from the drug. The facilities within the United States will either be a private center, or a detox program that offers low-cost or free services for their clients. An average cost for a private Buprenorphine detox program will be around a few thousand dollars, but will either go up or down from there, depending on the services being offered. Low-cost of free treatment programs will be significantly less, and as with most treatment options, many will accept state funded health insurance.