Alcoholic Anonymous Meetings in Wisconsin

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings have been a stable part of recovery in Wisconsin. Since its inception in the 1930s, AA has continued to offer a sober social connection for millions of people. There are a variety of different AA meetings. To help you find the one that is best for you, Drug Rehab Services has compiled a list of AA meetings in Wisconsin.

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List of AA Meetings in Wisconsin

Below is a list of the different AA meetings in Wisconsin. Each listing provides information on the types of services provided and the payment options available. You can also find accreditations and certifications to help you determine if the meeting is trusted and meets your needs. The list can be incomplete so please do not hesitate to contact a treatment specialist at 1-800-304-2219.

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2000 N Dewey Ave, Reedsburg, WI

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731 State St, Madison, WI

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201 South MI, Prairie Du Chien, WI

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105 21st St NE, Menomonie, WI

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2514 Jenny Lane, Green Bay, WI

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1528 N Ballard Rd (Suite 16), Appleton, WI

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620 Lake Street, Algoma, WI

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709 S 2nd Street, Alma, WI

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2926 Pomona Dr, Eau Claire, WI

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620 Lake Street, Algoma, WI

ASK A PROFESSIONAL

Alcoholics Anonymous, or AA for short, is a type of support group based on the principles of the 12-Steps. Meetings consist of members sitting together and sharing their personal experiences in recovery, along with reading literature about the AA method. There may also be prayer and the reciting of affirmations.

No. AA Meetings are not substance use treatment. They are intended to complement a complete addiction treatment program by providing additional support during and afterward. Support groups such as AA shouldn’t be used in place of a rehabilitation program for someone with active substance use disorder.

No, AA meetings don’t cost anything because they are a community-based support group put on by volunteers. AA meetings and membership are free and open to anyone who wishes to join. At most meetings, donations for things like building-space rental or coffee may be requested.

No. While they can be helpful, the use of AA meetings or other support groups is not required to stay sober. It all depends on the recovery model the person has chosen and what works for them.

The questions from Addicted.org’s “Ask a Professional” are answered by Michael Leach, CCMA. If you need further clarification on any of the questions above or have any other questions you can contact him directly at [email protected].

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Who Answers?

Calls to the website’s main number are answered by best treatment center LLC and Intervention, a call center that specializes in helping individuals and families find resources for substance use disorders.