Rehabs in Arizona for Drug & Alcohol

When looking for a drug rehab in Arizona, finding a quality facility that can provide expert care is essential. On this page, you will find a list of more than 30 drug rehab centers in Arizona. This includes over 20 outpatient programs, 15 long-term residential facilities, and more than 8 drug detox facilities. Alcohol rehab in Arizona is also a part of this listing. The page also includes some tips to help someone or for yourself with a very comprehensive section on the cost of treatment in Arizona. We included additional information to help someone get into rehab.

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List of Rehabs in Arizona

Below is a list of the different drug rehab centers in Arizona. Each listing provides information on the types of services provided and the payment options available. You can also find accreditations and certifications to help you determine if the rehab center is trusted and has the expertise you are looking for. The list can be incomplete so please do not hesitate to contact a treatment specialist at 1-800-304-2219.

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TIPS: If you feel you're going to use

  • Find a peer support group: Arizona 12-step meetings and find peer support groups through the Addicted.org directory.
  • Stay active and distracted—locate local fitness centers or community centers.
  • Access public counseling services or contact 2-1-1 Arizona.
  • Find an activity—experience Old Town, Lake Powel, Footprint Center, Phoenix Zoo, or Antelope Canyon.
  • Avoid risky situations. Methamphetamine and opioids remain the greatest drug threats in Arizona.

TIPS: If you want to help someone

  • Find local help with Medicaid through the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System.
  • Be aware of overdose risks—access community resources through the Arizona Department of Health Services.
  • Utilize the private and subsidized screening, rehabs in Arizona, and education facilities.
  • Never be afraid to organize a family intervention with a professional interventionist.
  • Avoid enabling anyone struggling with a substance use disorder.

Paying for Treatment in Arizona

The cost of a drug rehab in Arizona can vary depending on a few main factors. The program type and length can significantly affect how much treatment costs. But perhaps the most important variable is whether the person has health insurance and what kind.

Paying for Treatment with Medicaid in Arizona

Medicaid can make the cost of treatment in Arizona very low because it is designed to help people dealing with financial hardship who cannot afford private health insurance. It can cover as much as the entire cost of treatment with no expense to the person. But Medicaid is only accepted at certain facilities, which are usually quite full and often have long waiting lists to get in and start.

Using Private Insurance to pay for Drug Rehab in Arizona

Private health insurance can make it easier to get into treatment quickly but is usually more expensive to maintain, and it may not cover all treatment costs. Remember that the person must pay for the policy regularly to maintain it, which can be quite expensive.

Many people cannot afford private health coverage yet make too much to qualify for Medicaid assistance. This is a challenging position to be in, and traditionally these people would have gone uninsured. But thankfully, Arizona has expanded its Medicaid program to help cover more of these people. Through the state’s exchange marketplace, certain insurers offer policies at discounted rates, making coverage more realistic for many. More than 2.3 million people have Medicaid coverage in Arizona.

The following insurers are available in Arizona’s health insurance exchange marketplace for 2023:

  • Banner/Aetna CVS Health
  • Medica Community Health Plan
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona
  • Health Net of Arizona
  • Cigna
  • Oscar
  • Imperial Insurance Companies
  • UnitedHealthcare

Paying for Treatment when Uninsured

Even though there are many forms of assistance in Arizona, it doesn’t mean everyone has insurance coverage. For example, many people who abuse drugs fail to keep up with health insurance and don’t apply for assistance like Medicaid. This can leave them paying for treatment when uninsured.

Luckily, many programs across the state offer sliding-scale payment discounts to those with qualifying incomes. The more the person needs assistance, the greater the discount they receive. You can contact one of the treatment specialists at Addicted.org for more information on how to pay for treatment. Or contact the center directly.

Learn from our Experts

The cost of drug and alcohol rehabilitation in Arizona varies. Generally, for private long-term options, the price goes up. For example, someone can expect to pay $56,000 for a long-term residential facility in the state. However, costs change depending the facility and your insurance.

The average cost of outpatient drug rehab in Arizona is $1,700, yet this can go up with lengthier treatment. Clinical drug and alcohol detox costs between $250 and $800 daily. In comparison, medical detox can cost upwards of $1,000 a day at a private facility.

In addition, there are some low-cost and free treatment options within the state.

The standard length of time needed to treat drug and alcohol addiction in Arizona varies. Typically, it is based on individual needs as determined by an assessment. However, some of the following standard lengths of time should be considered:

  • The average length of stay at a clinical drug or alcohol detox center in Arizona is seven days or less. Yet medical detox may last 7 to 14 days or longer.
  • The average length of stay at an inpatient drug rehab in Arizona is around 4 to 6 weeks. There are some long-term facilities that can last up to 3 months or longer.
  • The average stay at an outpatient drug and alcohol rehabilitation program in Arizona is 30 days, yet this can be shorter, depending on individual needs and circumstances.

Based on treatment admissions, Arizona’s most commonly used drugs are alcohol and amphetamines.

If your loved one begins to show signs of alcoholism or amphetamine addiction, it is critical to intervene. The longer someone continues with their substance use, the harder it can be for them to stop.

The questions from Addicted.org’s “Learn from our Experts” are answered by Michael Leach, CCMA. If you need further clarification on any of the questions above or have any other questions you can contact him directly at [email protected].

https://www.samhsa.gov/
https://drugabusestatistics.org/

Addicted.org’s Evaluation of Drug Rehab in Arizona

After reviewing state statistics and options available for drug and alcohol rehab in Arizona, Addicted.org discovered the following pros and cons:

Pros

  • The Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System provides extensive behavioral health covered services. These services include treatment, rehabilitation, medical support, crisis intervention, behavioral health residential services, day programs, and prevention. In addition, numerous funding sources are administered by the Regional Behavioral Health Authority.
  • There is an even split of SAMHSA-listed substance use treatment programs classified as private non-profit and private for-profit, 50% and 42%, respectively—this means more affordable treatment and more variety of treatment methodology.
  • There are over 350 substance use treatment programs in the state, and roughly 23% are classified as residential non-hospital programs.
  • There are excellent drug and alcohol detoxification programs, with 83 listed by SAMHSA—5% residential non-hospital and 7% hospital inpatient.

Cons

  • There are limited in-house support and recovery options, including transitional housing, halfway houses, and sober living homes, with only 26 listed by SAMHSA.
  • Only 42% of the SAMHSA-listed substance use treatment programs provide treatment at no charge or minimal payment for clients who cannot pay. Yet, over 50% offer a sliding fee scale.

Arizona has excellent private and public substance use treatment options. Medicaid and private health insurance cover numerous aspects of treatment. Overall, individuals tend to receive good quality care and have access to a variety of rehabilitation methods.

State and Local Resources in Arizona

The Arizona Substance Misuse Prevention Resources

  • Extensive resources are provided, which include community prevention, family prevention, school prevention, occupation prevention, drug take-back events, and treatment. The resources are provided by the Arizona National Guard Counter Drug Task Force Civil Operations, the Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith, and Family, and the Community Outreach and Training Workgroup.

Arizona Department of Health Services—Opioid Prevention

  • Numerous resources are offered for prevention, treatment, and overdose prevention. The Arizona Department of Health Services provides extensive resources and options for substance use treatment and addiction.

The Arizona Center for Rural Health, Prescription Drug Overdose Prevention Program

  • Resources are provided to connect everyone to Arizona opioid use prevention, intervention, and treatment. It connects the individual to other state and local efforts to address substance use. AzCRH works with the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) and the UA College of Medicine, Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) to offer continuing medical education for Arizona prescribers (available at www.vlh.com/azprescribing/).

Arizona Parents Commission on Drug Education and Prevention

  • The organization comprises members appointed by the Governor to represent community members who work in fields specific to Education, the Courts, Law Enforcement, and Drug Treatment. The purpose is to fund a program that increases parental involvement and education about the serious risks and public health problems caused by the abuse of alcohol and controlled substances.
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CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ARTICLE

Michael Leach is a Certified Clinical Medical Assistant, who has over 5 years of experience working in the field of addiction. He spent his career working under the board-certified Addictionologist Dr. Rohit Adi. His experience includes working with families during their loved one’s stay in treatment, helping those with substance abuse issues find treatment, and teaching life skills to patients in a recovery atmosphere. Though he has worked in many different areas of rehabilitation, the majority of his time was spent working one on one with patients who were actively withdrawing from drugs. Withdrawal and the fear of going through it is one biggest reason why an addict continues to use and can be the most difficult part of the rehabilitation process. His experience in the withdrawal atmosphere has taught him that regardless of what approach a person takes to get off drugs, there are always mental and emotional obstacles that need to be overcome. He believes having someone there to help a person through these obstacles can make all the difference during the withdrawal process.

Dr. Rohit S. Adi is certified in addiction medicine, through examination, by the American Board of Addiction Medicine. While in Louisiana, he worked as an emergency-room physician at Our Lady of Lourdes Regional Medical Center in Lafayette, Louisiana, but then transferred to Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, where he works to this day. Holding numerous positions throughout his medical career, Dr. Adi has seen the devastating effects caused by drugs and alcohol. Having the ability to do something about the problem, he co-founded a holistic drug rehabilitation center in Louisiana, where he serves as the facility’s Medical Director.

Who Answers?

Calls to the website’s main number are answered by best treatment center LLC and Intervention, a call center that specializes in helping individuals and families find resources for substance use disorders.