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Search Inhalant Addiction Treatment by State

Search Inhalant Addiction Treatment by State

Drug & Alcohol Treatment Services for Inhalant Addiction in the United States

The National Institute of Health reports that roughly 22 million Americans age 12 or older have used inhalants. Unfortunately, inhalant use within the United States is one of the least studied forms of substance abuse. Inhalants are essentially any type of product such as spray paint, markers, glues, and cleaning products, which can be inhaled, and cause an intoxicating effect. These products contain dangerous substances, some of which have psychoactive Definition of the word psychoactive properties and cause mind altering effects. These various products can be purchased anywhere, and this is what makes inhalants dangerous, and an often forgotten about substance abuse problem. Some of the commonly abused inhalants do include solvents, such as liquids that become gas at room temperature. There are also aerosol sprays, gases, and nitrites, which are prescription medications for chest pain. Anyone who is abusing these drugs will find a way to inhale the vapors and will then experience the mind altering or psychoactive effects. These products are easily purchased and found at home and at the workplace, which could be markers, glues, and cleaning products.

The average individual will not think of these products as being addictive, because they do not have the purpose of being used for drug abuse. Unfortunately, inhalants are often used by children, and teens, and is also popular among the homeless population. When the inhalants are used, the vapor or fumes are taken in through the nose or mouth. This can be done through sniffing it, snorting the vapors, or bagging it, such as placing the product in a paper or plastic bag and inhaling the vapors. What does make inhalants dangerous, is the high which is produced, does not last very long, and the user will continue to inhale the product to maintain the effects. Commonly used inhalants include solvents such as, paint thinner, gasoline, lighter fluid, glue, markers, or cleaning products for electronics. There are also aerosols, such as spray paint, hair spray, or computer cleaning products. Along with this are gases, such as butane lighters, propane tanks, whipped cream canisters, ether, nitrous oxide, or chloroform.

Inhalants affect the mind and body in dangerous ways, such as causing slurred speech or a lack of coordination, euphoria, and dizziness. Some users will experience hallucinations or delusions, and with the continuous use, you will feel less self-conscious and not as much in control of your mind and body. The immediate health effects of inhalant use include liver and kidney damage, bone marrow damage, hearing loss, brain damage caused by cutting off the oxygen flows to the brain, and severe delayed behavioral development. There is also the possibility to overdose while using inhalants, and when the toxicity has reached a point that the body can no longer handle, it will begin to shut down. An overdose caused by inhalants can lead to serious and permanent effects, and even death. The symptoms will start with a seizure or coma, and if the body does not recover, the damage can be unchanging. Drug rehabilitation programs throughout the United States can help anyone who is abusing inhalants, and it is important to find the proper help and support.