Search Drug and Alcohol Rehabs in North Carolina by County

Created On Monday, 21, March 2016
Modified On Wednesday, 08, September 2021

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North Carolina struggles with drug and alcohol addiction of varying severities. Lately and since 2010, the state has seen some of its worst addiction problems to date. The issue is a real one, and with some of these issues the precedents on them have been thoroughly broken. For example, North Carolina now has drunk and drugged driving problems the likes of which it has never had before. Furthermore, the state also is experiencing some of the worst addiction problems amongst the nation’s youth that it has ever had to deal with before.

Substance Abuse Problems in North Carolina

The state of North Carolina has two main problems when it comes to substance abuse, other than what was named above. First, there are drug overdoses, more specifically, the deaths they have led to. The three counties with the highest mortality rates are Mecklenburg County with 480 deaths, Wake County with 369 deaths, and Guilford County with 282 deaths, all calculated per 100 000 population, according to County Health Rankings. The other issue is the opioid epidemic, and the number of overdoses linked to opioids have increased 500% from 1999 to 2016. In addition to that, fentanyl and heroin have become more and more available within the state. So, we can see that these issues will only keep getting worse if nothing is done to counter them.

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How to Effectively Fight Drug Abuse

In order to fight against drug abuse in an effective way, there needs to be enough help from organizations that will focus on the prevention of substance abuse. North Carolina has many of those available in its community, and we will take a look at a few of them. First, there is Talk It Out, and it is composed of a network of coalitions from different counties in North Carolina, and other statewide coalitions that all have the same goal, which is to change the culture concerning underage drinking within the state. Then, there is the North Carolina Pregnancy and Opioid Exposure Project (NC POEP), which provides resources, assistance, and information on opioid exposure during pregnancy, so as to inform individuals of the dangers of taking opioids while being pregnant, and to help those suffering from addiction as well. These organizations simply want North Carolina to be a safe place to live in, so that the community can go on and live healthy lives, free from addiction.

Below, you will find a list of the different substance abuse treatment available in the state of North Carolina. The list may be incomplete, so if you cannot find what you are looking for, please do not hesitate to contact one of our treatment specialists now at 1-800-304-2219.

List of Drug & Alcohol Addiction Services in North Carolina

CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ARTICLE

Marcel Gemme, DATS - Author

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Marcel Gemme has been helping people struggling with addiction for over 19 years. He first started as an intake counselor for a drug rehabilitation center in 2000. During his 5 years as an intake counselor, he helped many addicts get the treatment they needed. He also dealt with the families and friends of those people; he saw first-hand how much strain addiction puts on a family and how it can tear relationships apart. With drug and alcohol problems constantly on the rise in the United States and Canada, he decided to use the Internet as a way to educate and help many more people in both those countries. This was 15 years ago. Since then, Marcel has built two of the largest websites in the U.S. and Canada which reach and help millions of people each year. He is an author and a leader in the field of drug and alcohol addiction. His main focus is threefold: education, prevention and rehabilitation. To this day, he still strives to be at the forefront of technology in order to help more and more people. He is a Licensed Drug and Alcohol Treatment Specialist graduate with Honours of Stratford Career Institute. Marcel has also received a certificate from Harvard for completing a course entitled The Opioid Crisis in America and a certificate from The University of Adelaide for completing a course entitled AddictionX: Managing Addiction: A Framework for Succesful Treatment.