Middle School Curriculum – What are Edibles?

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Video for teens: What are Edibles?Download PDF Version

Goal and Rationale

The goal of this video, “What are Edibles”, from our teens series is to teach teens what edibles are, how edibles can be dangerous, and how they can make the right choices when it comes to identifying and rejecting edibles.

By the end of this activity, we hope that teens will be able to:

  • Describe what edibles are.
  • Explain how edibles can be dangerous.
  • Discuss the reasons that some people use edibles.
  • Evaluate the short and long-term effects that edibles can have on people.
  • Think about the different ways that edibles can impact them and their bodies.

Suggested procedure for educators

This video is five minutes and twenty-six seconds long, as you show the video to your students, pause the video at the 3:00 point to ask students the following questions:

Answer: Edibles are products that contain cannabinoids. Cannabinoids are the chemical compounds that when consumed affect the mind and body. One of them is THC.

Answer: some symptoms include: Edibles can come in the form of chocolates, candies, gummies, drinks, and more.

Answer: The effects of edibles last longer because they go through your digestive system. The effects can last up to 12 hours, with residual effects lasting up to 24 hours. Just imagine you’re at a friend’s house, you won’t be able to drive the same day without possible consequences or, if you have school or an exam the next day, you might still be high.

After discussing these questions with your students, resume the video. When the video ends, have students answer the following questions:

Answer: Don’t eat candies, chocolate, or any kinds of snacks if you don’t know where they came from, whether you’re in school, at a party or anywhere else. Of course, don’t take snacks from someone you don’t know or trust.

Answer: If you see one of your friends becoming paranoid, being very anxious, or hallucinating, don’t leave them alone and get some help by calling a responsible adult or even 911 if you see it getting out of control.

Answer: Don’t stop yourself from helping them because you think you or your friends will get in trouble. The consequences of not getting help could be way more catastrophic. Most states have “Samaritan laws” that protect people when they’re helping others.

Once your students have answered questions 1-6, proceed to a large group discussion using the thematic questions below. Depending on the grade level or age group of your students, you can expect this entire activity including the video to take between 20-30 minutes.

Discussion questions

Note: the sample answers below represent potential correct answers and can be used to facilitate deeper discussion with your students.

Answers will vary but could include: that even though edibles may look like candies they can be very dangerous and we shouldn’t eat them. They contain THC, the same chemical that is in marijuana.

Answers will vary but could include: the major differences include not having to smoke or breathe in edibles, they take longer to kick in, and the high or effect takes longer to kick in. However, they both very dangerous to our teenage bodies and minds.

Answers will vary but could include: determination, shame, pride, excitement, curiosity, confusion, fear, sadness, uncertainty, anxiety, and/or hope.

Answers will vary but could include: I didn’t know that edibles lasted so long, and that the fact they take some time to kick in leads some people to take more than they should, leading to overdoses and trips to the hospital.

Answers will vary but could include: this video helped me understand that edibles can really change the way I behave and think and makes me reconsider the impact that it can have on me in both the short and long-term. I also didn’t realize how dangerous they are and how long they last, and I am going to avoid them now.

Note: Teachers, please have your students share their feedback with us using the form linked below, we want to continue to make our message stronger and more effective. Thanks!

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